PHL 2560

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1. If one person stands up at a ball game, he will get a better view.  Therefore, if everyone stands up at a ballgame, everyone will get a better view.
This is an example of:
A.  Fallacy of composition
B.  Fallacy of division
C.  Appeal to popularity
D.  No fallacy

2. We have to take a stand on sex education in junior high schools.  If we teach sex education in the eighth grade, then seventh graders will want it, then sixth graders, and  fore  u know it, we  ll be  aching sex education in kindergarten!
This is an example of:
A.  Red herring
B.  Slippery slope
C.  Straw man
D.  No fallacy

3. Simpson has been a strong advocate for animal rights.  Animal rights includes not killing animals for our mere pleasure.  But Simpson wears leather shoes.  So it must be permissible to animals for our mere pleasure.
This is an example of:
A.  Ad hominem
B.  Equivocation
C.  Tu quoque
D.  No fallacy

4. Kant is far to dogmatic to appreciate the nuances of the bluffing argument, so we cannot  o his theory to resolve the question.
This is an example of:
A.  Appeal to ignorance
B.  Naturalistic fallacy
C.  Ad hominem
D.  Division

5. The majority of Americans polled recently indicate their disapproval  he way Congress conducts itself, so Congress is clearly operating in an inappropriate manner.
This is an example of:
A.  Appeal to emotion
B.  Appeal to ignorance
C.  Appeal to popularity
D.  No fallacy

6. George has been late to work every Thursday for ten years.  Tomorrow is Thursday.  So he will be late again tomorrow.
This is an example of:
A.  A strong causal argument
B.  A valid deductive
C.  The fallacy of composition
D.  The fallacy of division

7. Six is an odd number of legs for a horse.  Odd numbers cannot be divided by two. Therefore six cannot be divided by two.
This is an example of:
A.  Fallacy of division
B.  Fallacy of division
C.  Appeal to ignorance
D.  Fallacy of equivocation

8. My mother says I should stop smoking, but she smoked until forty, so there’s no need to quit just yet.
This is an example of:
A.  Tu quoque
B.  Appeal to ignorance
C.  Appeal to popularity
D.  Genetic fallacy

9. I know you’re no longer  y.  But finish your dinner anyway.  After all, there are millions of starving children in Africa.
This is an example of:
A.  Straw Man
B.  Red Herring
C.  Ad hominem
D.  Slippery slope

10. Employees have the right to take recreational drugs on their own time and at home, so it is right that they do.
This is an example of:
A.  Begging the question
B.  Tu quoque
C.  Equivocation
D.  No fallacy

11. The Senator says he refuses to raise taxes.  What he means is: on the rich.  Obviously he cares nothing about people who are struggling and trying to make ends meet.
This is an example of:
A.  Straw Man
B.  Red Herring
C.  Ad hominem
D.  Genetic fallacy

12. Only if Smith put more effort into his practice sessions than Jones did, does he win the gold.  Since Smith wins the gold, he must have put more effort into his practice sessions  Jones did.
This is an example of:
A.  Modus Ponens
B.  Modus Tollens
C.  Affirming the consequent
D.  Denying the consequent

13. A lot of people think that football players are stupid and boorish.  That’s a crock! Anyone who saw that fantastic game last Saturday, with three touchdowns before half time, would know this is just untrue. This is an example of:
A.  Straw Man
B.  Red Herring
C.  Ad hominem
D.  Composition

14. An argument with one or more informal fallacies cannot be valid.
True
False

15. Exorbitant CEO pay makes people miserable.  Therefore, exorbitant CEO pay is impermissible on utilitarian grounds. This is an example of:
A valid argument
A potentially valid argument with a hidden assumption.
An invalid argument incorporating the appeal to popularity

16. We should not adopt this new marketing strategy.  It will significantly cut into our profits.  Maximizing profits remains our highest priority. This is an example of:
A valid argument
A potentially valid argument with a hidden assumption.
An invalid argument incorporating a red herring.

17.  Smith:  I can’t accept the plan.  We’d be causing too much environmental damage.  And given that our product is, in fact, not essential, such damage is not ethically justified.
Jones:  But if don’t cut down those trees, someone else will, you know that. This is an example of:
A.  A red herring
B.  A straw man
C.  A circular argument
D.  No fallacy

18. The question “Did Jones embezzle from the company is an example of:
A.  A conceptual question
B.  An empirical question
C.  An evaluative question

19. The question “What strategy is most likely to produce the greatest profits for the company is an example of:
A.  A conceptual question
B.  An empirical question
C.  An evaluative question

20. The question Is Jones embezzlement from the company morally Impermissible is an example of:
A.  A conceptual question
B.  An empirical question
C.  An evaluative question

21. Evaluative questions are generally independent of empirical questions.
True
False

22. Moral obligation entails moral permissibility.
True
False